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Dethridge Groves Real Estate

Fremantle's Preferred Agent Since 1979

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Welcome To DGRE

With over 45 years of service to the greater Fremantle community, Dethridge Groves Real Estate is your local expert in real estate sales and property management. Three-time REIWA award-winners in marketing and communications, dgre has an expert team of real estate selling agents and property managers, led by former REIWA President Hayden Groves. dgre is your preferred, trusted real estate partner, having sold and managed more homes in and around Fremantle than any other agency. Contact us today for your free market appraisal, property management services, market analysis and general real estate advice from the community’s leading agency.

Properties we think you'll love

"Simone took on the job of selling our one bedroom apartment and did so successfully with minimum fuss...."

"Leanne is great! Highly recommend her for her communications and professionalism."

Luke

"I haven't had great experiences with rental agents in the past, quite the opposite. So it was a breath..."

Keren

Latest News

Jul 16, 2024

Ethics and Real Estate

As a junior sales agent many years ago, I lost a listing to a competitor. The seller’s rationale surprised, telling me, “We really like you, Hayden, and the other guy makes my skin crawl, but we reckon he can get us the best price.” The idea there was a disconnect between being a good person and achieving the best market price was difficult to comprehend then as it is today. The Governance Institute of Australia undertakes an annual survey of Australian society’s perceptions of ethics across the major occupational sectors. Unsurprisingly, nurses, veterinarians, doctors, teachers, ambulance and fire services all rank in the top ten of ethical occupations. The bottom ten are made up of lawyers, politicians, senior executives and fund managers. Real estate agents appear third last with 46 percent of those surveyed suggesting we were ‘somewhat unethical or very unethical’. Real estate agents appear third last Surprisingly, the Construction Forestry Maritime Mining Energy Union ranked higher in ethical behaviour than real estate professional associations. Clearly, the community judge us and those that represent our interests relatively harshly. With such a poor ethical reputation, it is surprising that many real estate agencies survive as long-standing small businesses. It’s hard to imagine a local restaurant, retail shop or other cottage business that suffered such a poor reputation surviving very long. As a local real estate practitioner and employer, reputation is everything. Damage your reputation through misconduct in the market and word quickly spreads that you’re untrustworthy. Most local agents enjoy a solid reputation, attract repeat business and have serviced their communities for years. For example, a quick Google search of Fremantle’s top three real estate agencies boast 558 reviews at an average of 4.6 stars. And ask random folk about real estate agents and the reply is often, “they’re terrible, but mine’s great!”. So, why the disconnect between community perception and most users of real estate services? Its noteworthy that during peak COVID in 2020, the ethical standing of agents improved, a result of our sector’s management of rental moratoriums and tricky selling environment. Current market conditions where buyers and tenants are disadvantaged can lead to a perception that agents are acting unethically. I think it is our fiduciary responsibility to work in our client’s best interest that impacts community perceptions of agents’ ethical conduct. Being duty bound to achieve the highest possible rent or market price for a property in times where supply is tight and demand is high, impacts those on the buying and renting side. It follows that a buyer or tenant can feel ‘forced by the agent’ to pay more and that is perceived as unethical behaviour. Perception or reality, the work of real estate agents requires greater transparency. The community clearly expects more from us in how we conduct our business. Agents can find reasons and get defensive about it, but the reality is we need to do more in this space to win the hearts and minds of the communities we serve....

Jun 27, 2024

Beat the Spring Rush

One of the major problems with the local property market right now is the blockages caused by short housing supply. Would-be sellers - whether up or down-sizing – are ‘stuck’ because they are struggling to find property that meets their needs and with short rental supply too, the usual ‘fall-back’ of renting for a period is also problematic. With only around 3,250 properties listed for sale on reiwa.com buying opportunities are limited considering there were around 14,000 listings less than five years ago. However, if you are considering selling your property, it's worth considering bringing your property to market sooner rather than later. Off the back of higher-than-expected inflation figures reported this week, interest rates could be on the rise again come August and with the usual spring listing rush not far away, more supply could come into the market. That said, it remains likely overall supply will remain below average levels for some time, particularly given higher levels of state migration, piling pressure on the demand side. Buyers remain hungry for quality property despite recent interest rate rises with sales numbers running at about 900 per week metro wide. Average days on market have settled though, stable at 8 days for the past three months. The Reserve Bank’s rapid increases in official cash rates added 35 percent to average mortgages in 12 months, or about $1,000 extra per month for an average mortgage. This is beginning to hurt those borrowers who took on low interest fixed rate mortgages in 2021, many of whom have properties in the outer suburbs. Supply in these markets will rise if these borrowers can’t meet these higher repayments. For property owners in and around Fremantle, coming to market now gives sellers the opportunity to buy closer to a settlement period that will align with more property coming to market in spring, avoiding the need for a ‘double move’. Sellers are holding the competitive advantage in the market so there’s opportunity to negotiate outcomes that include things like an extended settlement period or ‘rent back’ options. Importantly, in this market selling and buying within the same time-frame is preferrable as property values continue to rise, choice remains constrained, and investors turn their attention to our relatively under-valued market....

Jun 25, 2024

Use a REIWA Property Manager

Property management is more about managing the tenancy than it is about managing the property. The property manager’s primary role is managing the tenancy agreement as expressed by the terms of a lease and regulated by the Residential Tenancies Act. The property manager can only inspect the property on four occasions per year on behalf of the owner, so it is important that the tenant understands that it is them as the occupant, that effectively manages the property itself. For tenancies longer than three months, the Residential Tenancies Act (the ‘Act’) applies automatically (whether there is a formal lease or not) and it is foolhardy not to utilise the services of a competent property manager for a property asset, particularly during times of short supply and high demand. Management fees are not exorbitant and are tax deductible. And for the sake of saving a relatively small portion of the rental income in management fees, the risks of self-management are significant. A sound working knowledge of ever evolving legislation is essential, as is the capacity to properly reference check a prospective tenant. But, perhaps most importantly, much of the risk and responsibility attached to the management process is borne by the managing agent, giving property owners someone to rely on if the tenancy goes wrong. Even thoroughly assessed tenancies go off the rails on occasion due to a change in circumstances of the occupants; job loss, relationship failure and health issues are common reasons. A professional, well trained local agent is equipped to deal with this challenging issues when they arise. Finding the right tenant can be tricky too. Prospective tenants almost exclusively rely on the internet to find themselves a property, so owners without access to the favoured websites will find it difficult to attract the right tenant in the first place. There is great value in having a property manager act at ‘arm’s length’. Many a self-managing landlord has fallen into the trap of sympathising with their defaulting tenant and allowing rent arrears to build up over time hoping that they’ll “make good”. Acting at arm’s length affords the property manager a compassionate ‘just business’ approach to rent payments and the lease agreement more broadly. This is particularly important in these times of rising rents and inflationary pressures. Self-management often works well and for extended periods, but when a tenancy goes wrong, it is costly and stressful and it has been my experience that with all things considered, it is not worth the risk. ...

Jun 19, 2024

Get Your Price Right

Fremantle’s property market continues its positive trajectory with short supply and solid demand. This current imbalance is keeping up property values as buyers continue to compete for the limited homes available throughout the area. FOMO enthusiasm gives rise to some ‘unicorn’ selling outcomes too, with seller expectations sometimes rising faster than market sentiment. The short supply means agents are desperate for listing stock and, unfortunately, one response to this market is for agents to offer ‘happy prices’ to would-be sellers, the aim being to secure the listing and hope the market ‘catches up’ during their period of authority. friends, lovers and others have their own opinions Additionally, emotional attachment often leads homeowners to believe their property is worth more than a market consensus of a fair price. Opinion of market value for property is largely a subjective exercise; various agents will have differing views of market price, and friends, lovers and others have their own opinions that influence would-be sellers. Sellers who have committed to another property at a higher-than-hoped price will also be pressured to sell their own home for more than the market might bear. The result can be price expectations that exceed market reality. In truth, the value of a property is not determined until a buyer is found, negotiations finalised and the contract for sale completed. The combination of market information, comparative property sales analysis, demand and supply levels, buyer activity and property presentation provide an insight into what fair market price might eventuate for a property, but what does the anticipated or listing price have to do with the final market price? In short, plenty. Statistics show that sellers that over-price their property lose money in the end. Sellers that allow their property to languish on the market due to unrealistic price expectations (either derived from themselves or an over-zealous agent) end up fighting against the buyer sentiment of a “stale” listing; a property that has been on the market for above average periods of time. Such properties are often simply over-priced and buyers will discount them because they think “there must be something wrong with it if no one has bought it.” Sellers that discount listing prices to sell will almost always end up selling for less than if they had a realistic market price expectation from the beginning. Sellers are well advised to take in professional advice from a local REIWA agent and form a considered, unemotional opinion of value based on facts, evidence and reputable market data....

Jul 16, 2024

Ethics and Real Estate

As a junior sales agent many years ago, I lost a listing to a competitor. The seller’s rationale surprised, telling me, “We really like you, Hayden, and the other guy makes my skin crawl, but we reckon he can get us the best price.” The idea there was a disconnect between being a good person and achieving the best market price was difficult to comprehend then as it is today. The Governance Institute of Australia undertakes an annual survey of Australian society’s perceptions of ethics across the major occupational sectors. Unsurprisingly, nurses, veterinarians, doctors, teachers, ambulance and fire services all rank in the top ten of ethical occupations. The bottom ten are made up of lawyers, politicians, senior executives and fund managers. Real estate agents appear third last with 46 percent of those surveyed suggesting we were ‘somewhat unethical or very unethical’. Real estate agents appear third last Surprisingly, the Construction Forestry Maritime Mining Energy Union ranked higher in ethical behaviour than real estate professional associations. Clearly, the community judge us and those that represent our interests relatively harshly. With such a poor ethical reputation, it is surprising that many real estate agencies survive as long-standing small businesses. It’s hard to imagine a local restaurant, retail shop or other cottage business that suffered such a poor reputation surviving very long. As a local real estate practitioner and employer, reputation is everything. Damage your reputation through misconduct in the market and word quickly spreads that you’re untrustworthy. Most local agents enjoy a solid reputation, attract repeat business and have serviced their communities for years. For example, a quick Google search of Fremantle’s top three real estate agencies boast 558 reviews at an average of 4.6 stars. And ask random folk about real estate agents and the reply is often, “they’re terrible, but mine’s great!”. So, why the disconnect between community perception and most users of real estate services? Its noteworthy that during peak COVID in 2020, the ethical standing of agents improved, a result of our sector’s management of rental moratoriums and tricky selling environment. Current market conditions where buyers and tenants are disadvantaged can lead to a perception that agents are acting unethically. I think it is our fiduciary responsibility to work in our client’s best interest that impacts community perceptions of agents’ ethical conduct. Being duty bound to achieve the highest possible rent or market price for a property in times where supply is tight and demand is high, impacts those on the buying and renting side. It follows that a buyer or tenant can feel ‘forced by the agent’ to pay more and that is perceived as unethical behaviour. Perception or reality, the work of real estate agents requires greater transparency. The community clearly expects more from us in how we conduct our business. Agents can find reasons and get defensive about it, but the reality is we need to do more in this space to win the hearts and minds of the communities we serve....

Jun 27, 2024

Beat the Spring Rush

One of the major problems with the local property market right now is the blockages caused by short housing supply. Would-be sellers - whether up or down-sizing – are ‘stuck’ because they are struggling to find property that meets their needs and with short rental supply too, the usual ‘fall-back’ of renting for a period is also problematic. With only around 3,250 properties listed for sale on reiwa.com buying opportunities are limited considering there were around 14,000 listings less than five years ago. However, if you are considering selling your property, it's worth considering bringing your property to market sooner rather than later. Off the back of higher-than-expected inflation figures reported this week, interest rates could be on the rise again come August and with the usual spring listing rush not far away, more supply could come into the market. That said, it remains likely overall supply will remain below average levels for some time, particularly given higher levels of state migration, piling pressure on the demand side. Buyers remain hungry for quality property despite recent interest rate rises with sales numbers running at about 900 per week metro wide. Average days on market have settled though, stable at 8 days for the past three months. The Reserve Bank’s rapid increases in official cash rates added 35 percent to average mortgages in 12 months, or about $1,000 extra per month for an average mortgage. This is beginning to hurt those borrowers who took on low interest fixed rate mortgages in 2021, many of whom have properties in the outer suburbs. Supply in these markets will rise if these borrowers can’t meet these higher repayments. For property owners in and around Fremantle, coming to market now gives sellers the opportunity to buy closer to a settlement period that will align with more property coming to market in spring, avoiding the need for a ‘double move’. Sellers are holding the competitive advantage in the market so there’s opportunity to negotiate outcomes that include things like an extended settlement period or ‘rent back’ options. Importantly, in this market selling and buying within the same time-frame is preferrable as property values continue to rise, choice remains constrained, and investors turn their attention to our relatively under-valued market....

Jun 25, 2024

Use a REIWA Property Manager

Property management is more about managing the tenancy than it is about managing the property. The property manager’s primary role is managing the tenancy agreement as expressed by the terms of a lease and regulated by the Residential Tenancies Act. The property manager can only inspect the property on four occasions per year on behalf of the owner, so it is important that the tenant understands that it is them as the occupant, that effectively manages the property itself. For tenancies longer than three months, the Residential Tenancies Act (the ‘Act’) applies automatically (whether there is a formal lease or not) and it is foolhardy not to utilise the services of a competent property manager for a property asset, particularly during times of short supply and high demand. Management fees are not exorbitant and are tax deductible. And for the sake of saving a relatively small portion of the rental income in management fees, the risks of self-management are significant. A sound working knowledge of ever evolving legislation is essential, as is the capacity to properly reference check a prospective tenant. But, perhaps most importantly, much of the risk and responsibility attached to the management process is borne by the managing agent, giving property owners someone to rely on if the tenancy goes wrong. Even thoroughly assessed tenancies go off the rails on occasion due to a change in circumstances of the occupants; job loss, relationship failure and health issues are common reasons. A professional, well trained local agent is equipped to deal with this challenging issues when they arise. Finding the right tenant can be tricky too. Prospective tenants almost exclusively rely on the internet to find themselves a property, so owners without access to the favoured websites will find it difficult to attract the right tenant in the first place. There is great value in having a property manager act at ‘arm’s length’. Many a self-managing landlord has fallen into the trap of sympathising with their defaulting tenant and allowing rent arrears to build up over time hoping that they’ll “make good”. Acting at arm’s length affords the property manager a compassionate ‘just business’ approach to rent payments and the lease agreement more broadly. This is particularly important in these times of rising rents and inflationary pressures. Self-management often works well and for extended periods, but when a tenancy goes wrong, it is costly and stressful and it has been my experience that with all things considered, it is not worth the risk. ...

Jun 19, 2024

Get Your Price Right

Fremantle’s property market continues its positive trajectory with short supply and solid demand. This current imbalance is keeping up property values as buyers continue to compete for the limited homes available throughout the area. FOMO enthusiasm gives rise to some ‘unicorn’ selling outcomes too, with seller expectations sometimes rising faster than market sentiment. The short supply means agents are desperate for listing stock and, unfortunately, one response to this market is for agents to offer ‘happy prices’ to would-be sellers, the aim being to secure the listing and hope the market ‘catches up’ during their period of authority. friends, lovers and others have their own opinions Additionally, emotional attachment often leads homeowners to believe their property is worth more than a market consensus of a fair price. Opinion of market value for property is largely a subjective exercise; various agents will have differing views of market price, and friends, lovers and others have their own opinions that influence would-be sellers. Sellers who have committed to another property at a higher-than-hoped price will also be pressured to sell their own home for more than the market might bear. The result can be price expectations that exceed market reality. In truth, the value of a property is not determined until a buyer is found, negotiations finalised and the contract for sale completed. The combination of market information, comparative property sales analysis, demand and supply levels, buyer activity and property presentation provide an insight into what fair market price might eventuate for a property, but what does the anticipated or listing price have to do with the final market price? In short, plenty. Statistics show that sellers that over-price their property lose money in the end. Sellers that allow their property to languish on the market due to unrealistic price expectations (either derived from themselves or an over-zealous agent) end up fighting against the buyer sentiment of a “stale” listing; a property that has been on the market for above average periods of time. Such properties are often simply over-priced and buyers will discount them because they think “there must be something wrong with it if no one has bought it.” Sellers that discount listing prices to sell will almost always end up selling for less than if they had a realistic market price expectation from the beginning. Sellers are well advised to take in professional advice from a local REIWA agent and form a considered, unemotional opinion of value based on facts, evidence and reputable market data....